1. Piret Stern Dahl
  2. E-waste Challenge
  3. Saturday, January 23 2016, 08:03 PM
What is the scale of e-waste in your country?

Is it generated internally? Or is it exported or imported?

This discussion is part of the learning nugget The e-waste tsunami in the first module of The E-waste Challenge.
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Nikhil Umale Accepted Answer Pending Moderation
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E-waste is directly proportional to willingness to pay for such items and it depends on country's Economy strength and innovation power, Now people are more fascinated to Electronics such as Mobile and it becomes basic need.
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Good point - we often think gadgets are things we *need* but if so, how did we manage o survive without them? We *need* oxygen etc; the latest phone is a *want*
  1. Rianne ten Veen
  2. 1 year ago
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  1. more than a month ago
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  3. # 1
Shelley Soetosenojo Accepted Answer Pending Moderation
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The e-waste generated in my country is greatly linked to the amounts of electronic and electrical equipment imported, but it has not yet specifically quantified. It can be assumed that the IT e-waste will have grown in the past year, because of the measures to drop import tariffs on IT equipment.
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  1. more than a month ago
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  3. # 2
Luis Martinez Accepted Answer Pending Moderation
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A family in Argentine have about 40 e-devices. This number grows from 10 to 40 in last 6 years. In the next years we expect great grow of e-waste.
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That is a frightening statistic Luis. I am sure it is replicated in many other places in the world.
  1. Peter Desmond
  2. 11 months ago
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  1. more than a month ago
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Timmy de Vos Accepted Answer Pending Moderation
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The Netherlands, like most of the EU is generating a relatively large amount of e-waste (23,4 kg/inhabitant).

EU countries seem to generate less e-waste than other West-European non EU-countries like Iceland, Norway and Switzerland. This could have to do with working EU-Weee-policy, however other factors like economic situation may play a role too.
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  1. more than a month ago
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Roberta Ballabio Accepted Answer Pending Moderation
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Also Italy is generating a significant amount of waste (18.5 kg) at least officially. the The risk of illegal dumping is high considering the presence of criminal organizations, unfortunately rooted in many countries.
In Italy too the e-waste is expected to increase also due to what has been defined as "planned obsolescence", this is the trailer of Cosima Dannoritzer’s documentary film “The light bulb conspiracy- the untold story of planned obsolescence”
References
  1. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6N-KFj9Ps2w
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  1. more than a month ago
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  3. # 5
Giancarlo Lanzarini Accepted Answer Pending Moderation
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Switzerland is generating the highest amount of e-waste in Europe. It's as if everyone was carrying a bag of cement around (26.3 kg/inh) . Fortunately there are two PROs (SWICO and SENS) which take care of the sound disposal of e-waste.
I think in Swizerland the most of e-waste is generated internally.

Does anybody know whether in Swiss there are even electric and electronic equipment producers or just importers?
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  1. more than a month ago
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  3. # 6
Elisavet Angouria-Tsorochidou Accepted Answer Pending Moderation
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Denmark has a decreasing trend on e-waste. The amount of waste (in kg) that has been collected per inhabitant in 2007 and 2012 was 17 and 14, respectively (Eurostat). Currently there is an effort to create an integrated system for handling the e-waste, increase the percentage of reuse and recycling and therefore decrease the incineration fraction of the process.
The WEEE, especially, from households is collected at the municipal sorting and recycling facilities and the implemented producers responsibility means that they are responsible for the costs of transportation and treatment of WEEE.
References
  1. http://www.weeeregistration.com/weee-registration/denmark.html
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  1. more than a month ago
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  3. # 7
Will Sandes de Melo Accepted Answer Pending Moderation
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Brazil does not have an official collection system to e-waste yet. We’re making efforts to build a collection system based on the shared responsibility for the product life cycle. According to a 2012 study, Brazil is generating around (4,7 – 7,2) Kg/inh/year of e-waste.
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  1. more than a month ago
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  3. # 8
Marie-Helene ENRICI Accepted Answer Pending Moderation
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In France the ewaste generated is 22.2 kg/inhabitant. It seems that the figures related to the proportion released in dustbins together with household waste is slightly underestimated in the Balde Report (1kg/ inhabitant versus 1 to 2 kg/inhabitant according to Ademe report attached).
There is a tax in EU related to the recycling of WEEE. Each time you buy such an equipment, a small part of the cost is dedicated to recycling. Have you evaluated the efficiency of such measures: do the cost actually cover actual cost for recycling?

I have also the same question as my Italian colleague: is it possible to estimate the role of the planned obsolescence on these volumes of ewaste?

In addition I am really surprise with the figures for the US: only around 15% of the ewaste generated are actually collected. Even if those figures might need to be refined, how could be explained such bad results whereas 65% of the population is covered by a stae ewaste recycling law.
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  1. more than a month ago
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Manuel Alejandro Sánchez Olvera Accepted Answer Pending Moderation
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The last year in Mexico there was a legislation about the use of TV signal all over the country, this meant to end up with analogical broadcasts. People in Mexico were not prepared properly for this transition, because they needed a special television system or antenna to receive the transmission.
The main problem of this policy was that many people were not aware of what to do with their old television systems, so some of them throw them away or just let them on the street. Even tough there was information available for people, we witnessed that environmental and health issue.
Where I live, there are some companies that recycle e-waste, but the info about how they can be reached or found is not well distributed within the community.
References
  1. http://www.tdt.mx/preguntas_tdt.php
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  1. more than a month ago
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  3. # 10
Ndifreke Ekaette Accepted Answer Pending Moderation
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The e-waste generated in my country Nigeria is as result of used electrical/electronic importation and this contribute to large e-waste every year.
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  1. more than a month ago
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  3. # 11
Siria Arlett Cortés Accepted Answer Pending Moderation
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In southwest area from Mexico we haven't recycling companies or programs. Indeed most recycling companies are central and north zone. But Mexico have another phenomenon that is accumulation not only for high selling of computers, cell phones or screens but also Mexico receives by donation obsolete computers. This old equipment is delivered to schools in many zones.
Other hand, in some piers have been founded e-waste in containers without importation's permission. Also export e-waste.
I think there are many faces about e-waste management in Mexico that we need to solve.
References
  1. http://www.worldcomputerexchange.org/chicago-il
  2. http://www.profepa.gob.mx/innovaportal/v/5020/1/mx.wap/asegura_profepa_36_toneladas_de_residuos_peligrosos_y_basura_electronica.html
  3. http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2008-10-14/e-waste-the-dirty-secret-of-recycling-electronics
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  1. more than a month ago
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  3. # 12
HIKIMAH NABUKENYA Accepted Answer Pending Moderation
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The E-waste generated in Uganda is as a result of lack of recycling activities on these wastes, these end up in waste dump sites or recycled informally
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  1. more than a month ago
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  3. # 13
Alexander Alberto Moreta de Los Santos Accepted Answer Pending Moderation
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Electronic waste generated in my country is largely related to the quantities of imported electrical and electronic equipment. This contributes to the generation of electronic waste in Dominican Republic.

We are waiting for the statistics provided by the General Directorate of Customs to have the data on the import of electrical and electronic devices.

Dominican Republic does not have an official system for collecting electronic waste still.

In the coming years is expected strong growth of electronic waste.
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  1. more than a month ago
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  3. # 14
Tanmoy Ghosh Accepted Answer Pending Moderation
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India
India is one of the largest waste importing countries in the world. All types of wastes are imported into the country, in the form of cheap raw materials including hazardous and toxic wastes. Data released by the Customs Department reveal imports of even prohibited wastes like clinical waste, incineration ash, municipal waste and e-waste, all of which exceed 50 lakh tonnes annually. In 2009, India generated 5.9 million tonnes of hazardous waste domestically and imported 6.4 million tonnes.
So far, India has been the destination of the hazardous and industrial wastes like mercury, electronic and plastic wastes from the United States; asbestos from Canada; defective steel and tin plates from the E.U., Australia and the U.S.; toxic waste oil from the United Arab Emirates, Iran and Kuwait; zinc ash, residues and skimmings, lead waste and scrap, used batteries and waste and scrap of metals such as cadmium, chromium, cobalt, antimony, hafnium and thallium from Germany, Denmark, the Netherlands, the United Kingdom, Belgium and Norway. These wastes contain toxic components which are damaging to the public health and environment.
New draft rules on the import and the management of e-waste are currently being considered. Till the rules are notified, the Hazardous Wastes (Management, Handling and Trans boundary Movement) Rules, 2008 regulate the export import trade or trans boundary movements of hazardous wastes including e-waste. According to these Rules, import of hazardous wastes for disposal is not permitted. However, import of waste is permitted only for reuse, recycling or reprocessing. Monitoring of units recycling hazardous wastes is the responsibility of the State Pollution Control Board or the Pollution Control Committee in a Union Territory. The Rules also require all import consignments to be accompanied by a movement document and a test report from an accredited laboratory or a pre-shipment inspection certificate from a recognized agency.
The proposed e-waste rules, 2011 do not address the issue of import/export of e-waste. The trans boundary movement of hazardous waste including e-waste is regulated by the Hazardous Waste Rules, 2008. Import of e-waste can be considered for actual users only with the permission of Ministry of Environment and Forests and licence from Directorate General of Foreign Trade

Everyone has a part to play in meeting the challenge of e-waste. Whatever your job, field of study, or interest, wherever you live and work, e-waste affects you and the generations to come. We can make a difference individually - and by coming together we can turn the tide of e-waste.
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  1. more than a month ago
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  3. # 15
Alan Long Accepted Answer Pending Moderation
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The amount of e-waste generated in the Netherlands is high (23.4kg/inh), but a recent article in Recycling International suggests the collection rate is improving. Wecycle is an organisation responsible for ensuring that e-waste is collected and processed according to the WEEE regulation.
It is, in theory, suppose to be difficult to import or export e-waste from and to the EU. However, according to CWIT two thirds of e-waste remains unaccounted thus it is difficult to verify whether this is illegally transported or recycled unregulated.
References
  1. http://www.recyclinginternational.com/recycling-news/9584/e-scrap-and-batteries/netherlands/dutch-take-back-scheme-shatters-collection-target
  2. http://www.wecycle.nl/
  3. http://www.cwitproject.eu/
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  1. more than a month ago
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  3. # 16
Abdulkarim Rashed Accepted Answer Pending Moderation
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The amount of e-waste generated in the Bahrain is high (12.9 kg/inh), just I know this information through MOOC.
we need an urgent actions to tackle this hidden problem, because there is no treatment facilities in my country to treat this type of waste.
only small initiative from some companies which dismantle their electronic and electric equipment.
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  1. more than a month ago
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  3. # 17
Gerardo Canavati Accepted Answer Pending Moderation
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Since 2002 I have improved new procedures and techniques and increasing my position and have interacted with communities, universities and government towards this activity. Also with the employees and students made some events to collect e-waste from their homes.
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  1. more than a month ago
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  3. # 18
Efstathios Vaitsos Accepted Answer Pending Moderation
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E - waste in Greece.
The average annual production of e-waste in Greece for the period 2003-2006 amounted to 170 Kt approximately, representing 3.8% of the total amount of domestic solid apovlitonTo 90% of e-waste for the same period had been mixed with other urban
Waste or recycled had with other materials (e.g., scrap metal), without
processing ( "gray recycling";). To address both the growing problem of
"Recycling gray" and the increasing amounts of e-waste, launched in 2004 feature
an authorized alternative e-waste management system with the main responsibilities
collection, transport and treatment in special facilities. The system collected approximately 0.1 Kt for 2005 which was the first of the running time, 31.5 kt for 2007, 47 Kt in 2008 and 25
Kt for the first five months of 2009, exceeding the national target as determined by
European and Greek legislation. These objectives include the separate collection
at least 4 kg / capita / year electronic waste households, a total of 44
Kt / year for Greece. Nevertheless even today appliances available with non
controlled manner resulting in the collection of vendors and their promotion in units
recovery of metals and alloys.
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  1. more than a month ago
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  3. # 19
Zornitsa Tsoneva Accepted Answer Pending Moderation
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Around 90% of collected e-waste in Bulgaria (above 65% collection rate/2013) is treated in Bulgaria. Less than one percent is sent for treatment somewhere else in the EU. None is exported outside the EU.
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  1. more than a month ago
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  3. # 20
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